Death on a Crank

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As of late I’ve been reading Leah Libresco’s wonderful blog (and I have a little post about the nature of her posts bouncing around my head) and recently discovered the Paternoster.  As a student of architecture, I am being prepped for the “real world” by such classes as Building Systems, where I begin to learn code things and the reasons for them.  My prof for the class pointed out that codes are instituted after horrific catastrophes so that they don’t happen again (like the 4″ ball rule for railing spindles), and that it is the job of the architect to make everything ADA accessible and so that anyone who dies will be from a freak accident and not because there was something wrong with the building.  The Paternoster, however, is–as the title of this post suggests–what I assessed to be “death on a crank.”  The sheer number of things which could go wrong is so astronomical that my poor mind is blown just thinking that such things were actually allowed and used.  Also it’s just plain terrifying.

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